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Joint Letter to the European Commission on the Need for Harmonised EPR Rules

In light of the current EU and its Member States discussions on the extended producer responsibility (EPR)schemes, the Policy Hub together with Circle Economy, Euratex, EuRIC, EuroCommerce, Government ofCatalonia, and the Municipality of Milan sent a letter to the EuropeanCommission asking for EU-harmonised rules for EPR.

According to the signatories, the harmonisation of EPR rules is ‘’a key enabler for championing the transition to a circular and climate-neutral apparel and footwear sector in the EU’’.

The benefits of a harmonised EPR scheme are far-reaching, and among the others, would: enable companies to consistently make more sustainable product design choices; allow the scaling up of textile, apparel, and footwear waste collection faster and more efficiently; incentivise setting up more effective flows of ‘post-consumer wastes’ and the ‘capital needed to establish infrastructures’ across the EU; reduce the costs of recirculation of materials and resources, and help to establish transparent and uniform reporting requirements on waste and resource flows across the EU creating traceability and transparency – prerequisites fora safe circular system.

On the other hand, left unharmonised the EPR rules would create a risk of market fragmentation of national waste management systems, which could further delay the development of circular textiles, apparel, and footwear products in the EU. Not to mention that the above-listed benefits of harmonised EPR would be lost.

What should the harmonised EPR rules entail?

The signatories of the letter asked for the EU-wide harmonised rules on the scope and requirements on EPR for textiles, apparel, and footwear which should include: a set of common definitions providing the basis for EU eco-modulation; a clear scope and allocation of responsibilities across all relevant stakeholders, a robust mechanism of monitoring, control, and surveillance, and a transparent reporting system.

What’s next?

The European Commission is preparing guidelines on the implementation of the general minimum requirements for EPR schemes, which are scheduled to be launched this year. Yet, there is an appetite for binding rules to be set at the EU level to ensure the needed harmonisation of EPR schemes, as expressed in the current letter from the textile industry representatives, collectors, sorters, recyclers, municipalities, cities, and civil society. Will the EU follow these recommendations? Let’s wait and see!

Access the Joint EPR Letter here.

In light of the current EU and its Member States discussions on the extended producer responsibility (EPR)schemes, the Policy Hub together with Circle Economy, Euratex, EuRIC, EuroCommerce, Government ofCatalonia, and the Municipality of Milan sent a letter to the EuropeanCommission asking for EU-harmonised rules for EPR.

According to the signatories, the harmonisation of EPR rules is ‘’a key enabler for championing the transition to a circular and climate-neutral apparel and footwear sector in the EU’’.

The benefits of a harmonised EPR scheme are far-reaching, and among the others, would: enable companies to consistently make more sustainable product design choices; allow the scaling up of textile, apparel, and footwear waste collection faster and more efficiently; incentivise setting up more effective flows of ‘post-consumer wastes’ and the ‘capital needed to establish infrastructures’ across the EU; reduce the costs of recirculation of materials and resources, and help to establish transparent and uniform reporting requirements on waste and resource flows across the EU creating traceability and transparency – prerequisites fora safe circular system.

On the other hand, left unharmonised the EPR rules would create a risk of market fragmentation of national waste management systems, which could further delay the development of circular textiles, apparel, and footwear products in the EU. Not to mention that the above-listed benefits of harmonised EPR would be lost.

What should the harmonised EPR rules entail?

The signatories of the letter asked for the EU-wide harmonised rules on the scope and requirements on EPR for textiles, apparel, and footwear which should include: a set of common definitions providing the basis for EU eco-modulation; a clear scope and allocation of responsibilities across all relevant stakeholders, a robust mechanism of monitoring, control, and surveillance, and a transparent reporting system.

What’s next?

The European Commission is preparing guidelines on the implementation of the general minimum requirements for EPR schemes, which are scheduled to be launched this year. Yet, there is an appetite for binding rules to be set at the EU level to ensure the needed harmonisation of EPR schemes, as expressed in the current letter from the textile industry representatives, collectors, sorters, recyclers, municipalities, cities, and civil society. Will the EU follow these recommendations? Let’s wait and see!

Access the Joint EPR Letter here.

In light of the current EU and its Member States discussions on the extended producer responsibility (EPR)schemes, the Policy Hub together with Circle Economy, Euratex, EuRIC, EuroCommerce, Government ofCatalonia, and the Municipality of Milan sent a letter to the EuropeanCommission asking for EU-harmonised rules for EPR.

According to the signatories, the harmonisation of EPR rules is ‘’a key enabler for championing the transition to a circular and climate-neutral apparel and footwear sector in the EU’’.

The benefits of a harmonised EPR scheme are far-reaching, and among the others, would: enable companies to consistently make more sustainable product design choices; allow the scaling up of textile, apparel, and footwear waste collection faster and more efficiently; incentivise setting up more effective flows of ‘post-consumer wastes’ and the ‘capital needed to establish infrastructures’ across the EU; reduce the costs of recirculation of materials and resources, and help to establish transparent and uniform reporting requirements on waste and resource flows across the EU creating traceability and transparency – prerequisites fora safe circular system.

On the other hand, left unharmonised the EPR rules would create a risk of market fragmentation of national waste management systems, which could further delay the development of circular textiles, apparel, and footwear products in the EU. Not to mention that the above-listed benefits of harmonised EPR would be lost.

What should the harmonised EPR rules entail?

The signatories of the letter asked for the EU-wide harmonised rules on the scope and requirements on EPR for textiles, apparel, and footwear which should include: a set of common definitions providing the basis for EU eco-modulation; a clear scope and allocation of responsibilities across all relevant stakeholders, a robust mechanism of monitoring, control, and surveillance, and a transparent reporting system.

What’s next?

The European Commission is preparing guidelines on the implementation of the general minimum requirements for EPR schemes, which are scheduled to be launched this year. Yet, there is an appetite for binding rules to be set at the EU level to ensure the needed harmonisation of EPR schemes, as expressed in the current letter from the textile industry representatives, collectors, sorters, recyclers, municipalities, cities, and civil society. Will the EU follow these recommendations? Let’s wait and see!

Access the Joint EPR Letter here.

In light of the current EU and its Member States discussions on the extended producer responsibility (EPR)schemes, the Policy Hub together with Circle Economy, Euratex, EuRIC, EuroCommerce, Government ofCatalonia, and the Municipality of Milan sent a letter to the EuropeanCommission asking for EU-harmonised rules for EPR.

According to the signatories, the harmonisation of EPR rules is ‘’a key enabler for championing the transition to a circular and climate-neutral apparel and footwear sector in the EU’’.

The benefits of a harmonised EPR scheme are far-reaching, and among the others, would: enable companies to consistently make more sustainable product design choices; allow the scaling up of textile, apparel, and footwear waste collection faster and more efficiently; incentivise setting up more effective flows of ‘post-consumer wastes’ and the ‘capital needed to establish infrastructures’ across the EU; reduce the costs of recirculation of materials and resources, and help to establish transparent and uniform reporting requirements on waste and resource flows across the EU creating traceability and transparency – prerequisites fora safe circular system.

On the other hand, left unharmonised the EPR rules would create a risk of market fragmentation of national waste management systems, which could further delay the development of circular textiles, apparel, and footwear products in the EU. Not to mention that the above-listed benefits of harmonised EPR would be lost.

What should the harmonised EPR rules entail?

The signatories of the letter asked for the EU-wide harmonised rules on the scope and requirements on EPR for textiles, apparel, and footwear which should include: a set of common definitions providing the basis for EU eco-modulation; a clear scope and allocation of responsibilities across all relevant stakeholders, a robust mechanism of monitoring, control, and surveillance, and a transparent reporting system.

What’s next?

The European Commission is preparing guidelines on the implementation of the general minimum requirements for EPR schemes, which are scheduled to be launched this year. Yet, there is an appetite for binding rules to be set at the EU level to ensure the needed harmonisation of EPR schemes, as expressed in the current letter from the textile industry representatives, collectors, sorters, recyclers, municipalities, cities, and civil society. Will the EU follow these recommendations? Let’s wait and see!

Access the Joint EPR Letter here.

Measure
Measure
Reduce
Reduce
Support
Support
Innovate
Innovate

Joint Letter to the European Commission on the Need for Harmonised EPR Rules

In light of the current EU and its Member States discussions on the extended producer responsibility (EPR)schemes, the Policy Hub together with Circle Economy, Euratex, EuRIC, EuroCommerce, Government ofCatalonia, and the Municipality of Milan sent a letter to the EuropeanCommission asking for EU-harmonised rules for EPR.

According to the signatories, the harmonisation of EPR rules is ‘’a key enabler for championing the transition to a circular and climate-neutral apparel and footwear sector in the EU’’.

The benefits of a harmonised EPR scheme are far-reaching, and among the others, would: enable companies to consistently make more sustainable product design choices; allow the scaling up of textile, apparel, and footwear waste collection faster and more efficiently; incentivise setting up more effective flows of ‘post-consumer wastes’ and the ‘capital needed to establish infrastructures’ across the EU; reduce the costs of recirculation of materials and resources, and help to establish transparent and uniform reporting requirements on waste and resource flows across the EU creating traceability and transparency – prerequisites fora safe circular system.

On the other hand, left unharmonised the EPR rules would create a risk of market fragmentation of national waste management systems, which could further delay the development of circular textiles, apparel, and footwear products in the EU. Not to mention that the above-listed benefits of harmonised EPR would be lost.

What should the harmonised EPR rules entail?

The signatories of the letter asked for the EU-wide harmonised rules on the scope and requirements on EPR for textiles, apparel, and footwear which should include: a set of common definitions providing the basis for EU eco-modulation; a clear scope and allocation of responsibilities across all relevant stakeholders, a robust mechanism of monitoring, control, and surveillance, and a transparent reporting system.

What’s next?

The European Commission is preparing guidelines on the implementation of the general minimum requirements for EPR schemes, which are scheduled to be launched this year. Yet, there is an appetite for binding rules to be set at the EU level to ensure the needed harmonisation of EPR schemes, as expressed in the current letter from the textile industry representatives, collectors, sorters, recyclers, municipalities, cities, and civil society. Will the EU follow these recommendations? Let’s wait and see!

Access the Joint EPR Letter here.

In light of the current EU and its Member States discussions on the extended producer responsibility (EPR)schemes, the Policy Hub together with Circle Economy, Euratex, EuRIC, EuroCommerce, Government ofCatalonia, and the Municipality of Milan sent a letter to the EuropeanCommission asking for EU-harmonised rules for EPR.

According to the signatories, the harmonisation of EPR rules is ‘’a key enabler for championing the transition to a circular and climate-neutral apparel and footwear sector in the EU’’.

The benefits of a harmonised EPR scheme are far-reaching, and among the others, would: enable companies to consistently make more sustainable product design choices; allow the scaling up of textile, apparel, and footwear waste collection faster and more efficiently; incentivise setting up more effective flows of ‘post-consumer wastes’ and the ‘capital needed to establish infrastructures’ across the EU; reduce the costs of recirculation of materials and resources, and help to establish transparent and uniform reporting requirements on waste and resource flows across the EU creating traceability and transparency – prerequisites fora safe circular system.

On the other hand, left unharmonised the EPR rules would create a risk of market fragmentation of national waste management systems, which could further delay the development of circular textiles, apparel, and footwear products in the EU. Not to mention that the above-listed benefits of harmonised EPR would be lost.

What should the harmonised EPR rules entail?

The signatories of the letter asked for the EU-wide harmonised rules on the scope and requirements on EPR for textiles, apparel, and footwear which should include: a set of common definitions providing the basis for EU eco-modulation; a clear scope and allocation of responsibilities across all relevant stakeholders, a robust mechanism of monitoring, control, and surveillance, and a transparent reporting system.

What’s next?

The European Commission is preparing guidelines on the implementation of the general minimum requirements for EPR schemes, which are scheduled to be launched this year. Yet, there is an appetite for binding rules to be set at the EU level to ensure the needed harmonisation of EPR schemes, as expressed in the current letter from the textile industry representatives, collectors, sorters, recyclers, municipalities, cities, and civil society. Will the EU follow these recommendations? Let’s wait and see!

Access the Joint EPR Letter here.

In light of the current EU and its Member States discussions on the extended producer responsibility (EPR)schemes, the Policy Hub together with Circle Economy, Euratex, EuRIC, EuroCommerce, Government ofCatalonia, and the Municipality of Milan sent a letter to the EuropeanCommission asking for EU-harmonised rules for EPR.

According to the signatories, the harmonisation of EPR rules is ‘’a key enabler for championing the transition to a circular and climate-neutral apparel and footwear sector in the EU’’.

The benefits of a harmonised EPR scheme are far-reaching, and among the others, would: enable companies to consistently make more sustainable product design choices; allow the scaling up of textile, apparel, and footwear waste collection faster and more efficiently; incentivise setting up more effective flows of ‘post-consumer wastes’ and the ‘capital needed to establish infrastructures’ across the EU; reduce the costs of recirculation of materials and resources, and help to establish transparent and uniform reporting requirements on waste and resource flows across the EU creating traceability and transparency – prerequisites fora safe circular system.

On the other hand, left unharmonised the EPR rules would create a risk of market fragmentation of national waste management systems, which could further delay the development of circular textiles, apparel, and footwear products in the EU. Not to mention that the above-listed benefits of harmonised EPR would be lost.

What should the harmonised EPR rules entail?

The signatories of the letter asked for the EU-wide harmonised rules on the scope and requirements on EPR for textiles, apparel, and footwear which should include: a set of common definitions providing the basis for EU eco-modulation; a clear scope and allocation of responsibilities across all relevant stakeholders, a robust mechanism of monitoring, control, and surveillance, and a transparent reporting system.

What’s next?

The European Commission is preparing guidelines on the implementation of the general minimum requirements for EPR schemes, which are scheduled to be launched this year. Yet, there is an appetite for binding rules to be set at the EU level to ensure the needed harmonisation of EPR schemes, as expressed in the current letter from the textile industry representatives, collectors, sorters, recyclers, municipalities, cities, and civil society. Will the EU follow these recommendations? Let’s wait and see!

Access the Joint EPR Letter here.

In light of the current EU and its Member States discussions on the extended producer responsibility (EPR)schemes, the Policy Hub together with Circle Economy, Euratex, EuRIC, EuroCommerce, Government ofCatalonia, and the Municipality of Milan sent a letter to the EuropeanCommission asking for EU-harmonised rules for EPR.

According to the signatories, the harmonisation of EPR rules is ‘’a key enabler for championing the transition to a circular and climate-neutral apparel and footwear sector in the EU’’.

The benefits of a harmonised EPR scheme are far-reaching, and among the others, would: enable companies to consistently make more sustainable product design choices; allow the scaling up of textile, apparel, and footwear waste collection faster and more efficiently; incentivise setting up more effective flows of ‘post-consumer wastes’ and the ‘capital needed to establish infrastructures’ across the EU; reduce the costs of recirculation of materials and resources, and help to establish transparent and uniform reporting requirements on waste and resource flows across the EU creating traceability and transparency – prerequisites fora safe circular system.

On the other hand, left unharmonised the EPR rules would create a risk of market fragmentation of national waste management systems, which could further delay the development of circular textiles, apparel, and footwear products in the EU. Not to mention that the above-listed benefits of harmonised EPR would be lost.

What should the harmonised EPR rules entail?

The signatories of the letter asked for the EU-wide harmonised rules on the scope and requirements on EPR for textiles, apparel, and footwear which should include: a set of common definitions providing the basis for EU eco-modulation; a clear scope and allocation of responsibilities across all relevant stakeholders, a robust mechanism of monitoring, control, and surveillance, and a transparent reporting system.

What’s next?

The European Commission is preparing guidelines on the implementation of the general minimum requirements for EPR schemes, which are scheduled to be launched this year. Yet, there is an appetite for binding rules to be set at the EU level to ensure the needed harmonisation of EPR schemes, as expressed in the current letter from the textile industry representatives, collectors, sorters, recyclers, municipalities, cities, and civil society. Will the EU follow these recommendations? Let’s wait and see!

Access the Joint EPR Letter here.

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